POPPYCOCK

jibber jabber

54,303 notes

burntloaferings:


morbi:

zephyres:

がしゃどくろ

The Gashadokuro are such a cool folklore concept.
My favorite thing is this idea that they somehow are able to silently stalk people despite being almost 100-foot tall skeletons, because no one looks up.

Gashadokuro aka the starving skeletons are the reanimated and combined bones of the victims of starvation. Up to a hundred feet tall, they are heralded by the sound of bells ringing in the ears of their victims. They reach down from above to capture people and bit their heads off. The Gashadokuro haunt the darkness after midnight.

burntloaferings:

morbi:

zephyres:

がしゃどくろ

The Gashadokuro are such a cool folklore concept.

My favorite thing is this idea that they somehow are able to silently stalk people despite being almost 100-foot tall skeletons, because no one looks up.

Gashadokuro aka the starving skeletons are the reanimated and combined bones of the victims of starvation. Up to a hundred feet tall, they are heralded by the sound of bells ringing in the ears of their victims. They reach down from above to capture people and bit their heads off. The Gashadokuro haunt the darkness after midnight.

(Source: fleshosphere, via bythegods)

746,042 notes

chibird:

ask-rainy-water-princess:

HELLO YES THE ARTIST OF ALL THESE BEAUTIFUL MOTIVATIONAL POSTS IS THE LOVELY CHIBIRD

okay yes carry on reblogging <3

Oh my goodness! This collection of my posts from last April has reached over 600,000+ notes, and that’s super exciting for me. Thank you to the sweet Keri for adding in the source. All my love and appreciation goes out to you guys, whether you’ve been following me for 3 years or 3 days. <3 

(Source: nijitsundere)

0 notes

The idea used to be that when two people got married, they became one. Today’s brides and grooms are likely to believe that one and one still makes two. Many couples acknowledge this at their wedding by having someone read from Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet (1976). In this passage on marriage, Gibran urges couples to have spaces in their togetherness. “Stand together yet not too near together: for the pilars of the temple stand apart, and the oak tree and cypress grow not in each other’s shadow.”

Gibran is describing healthy limits. The opposite, enmeshment, is comparable to the oak tree and the cypress growing so close together that their branches and roots become entwined. Soon, there’s no room for either tree to grow; parts of each tree die, and neither reaches its full potential.

Unlike compromise, which is a conscious give and take, enmeshment involves denying who you are or what you need, to please someone else.

-Stop Walking On Eggshells: taking your life back when someone you care about has borderline personality disorder by Paul T. Mason & Randi Kreger

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